en English

Repeat Prescriptions

If you need regular medication and your Doctor does not need to see you every time, you will be issued with a repeat prescription.

Requesting Medication

Please note that for privacy reasons this form will not store your details.

Please allow a minimum of 2 working days to process your prescription and be aware that it may take another 5 days until ready at the pharmacy. When you send this form you will receive a notification to tell you whether it has been submitted successfully.

Forgot to request a repeat prescription?

If you forget to request a repeat prescription

If you forget to request a repeat prescription and will run out of important medicines, you may be able to get help from your Pharmacy.

You must then take with you to the relevant Pharmacy, proof of both your identification and of your medication (for example, your repeat prescription list or the empty box which should have your details printed on it). Please note that controlled drugs and antibiotics are not provided through this service, you will need to ring 111 when the surgery is closed.

Local Pharmacies

Rowlands Pharmacy, Kinross

Rowlands will give you the right hand side of your prescription when you collect your medication.  You may use this to re-order the prescription by ticking the items you require and delivering the form to Rowlands or to the Health Centre. 

When the prescription is prepared, it will be sent to Rowlands where you can collect your medication.

Rowlands do not accept requests for repeat medication over the telephone. 

Davidsons Pharmacy, Milnathort/Bridge of Earn

Davidsons will give you the right hand side of your prescription when you collect your medication.  You may use to re-order the prescription by ticking the items you require and delivering the form to Davidsons or to the Health Centre. 

When the prescription is prepared, it will be sent to Davidsons where you can collect your medication.

Davidsons do not accept requests for repeat medication over the telephone. 

Other ways to order a prescription

By post

You can post your prescription slip or written request to us at the Practice. You must include a stamped addressed envelope for return by post if you will not be able to pick up your prescription from the Surgery (please allow extra time for any possible delays with the postal service).

In-person

You can order in person by returning the right-hand half of a previous prescription for the required medications, or by submitting a handwritten request. You may then put your request in the grey box to the right of the front door.

Telephone

We do not accept requests for repeat prescriptions by telephone. This prevents the risk of dangerous errors being made and leaves the telephone lines free for urgent matters.

Additional information

Chronic Medication Service

The NHS Chronic Medication Service is a voluntary service for people with long-term conditions. It’s available at all community pharmacies across Scotland.

You can only use this service if you’ve registered with a community pharmacy.

Hospital and Community Requests

When you are discharged from hospital you should normally receive seven days supply of medication.

On receipt of your discharge medication, which will be issued to you by the Hospital, please contact the Surgery to provide them with this information before your supply of medication has run out.

Hospital requests for a change of medication will be checked by a prescribing clinician first, and if necessary a prescribing clinician will provide you with a prescription on request. 

However, in many situations, it will not be necessary to start taking the medication straight away and hospitals will give the prescription to the patient to take it to their GP practice. Such prescriptions in hospitals should be delivered to the Health Centre.

Please allow two working days for the prescription to be processed.

Medication reviews

Doctors at the practice regularly review the medication patients are taking. This may involve changes to your medication and is in accordance with current Health Authority policies. Please be reassured that this will not affect your treatment. We may sometimes want to consult with you for a medication review and this may involve blood tests. It is very important that you attend these appointments.

Non-repeat items (acute or special requests)

Non-repeat prescriptions, known as ‘acute’ prescriptions are medicines that have been issued by the Doctor but not added to your repeat prescription records. This is normally a new medication issued for a trial period, and may require a review visit with your Doctor prior to the medication being added to your repeat prescription records.

Some medications are recorded as acute as they require to be closely monitored by the Doctor. Examples include many anti-depressants, drugs of potential abuse or where the prescribing is subject to legal or clinical restrictions or special criteria. If this is the case with your medicine, you may not always be issued with a repeat prescription until you have consulted with your Doctor again.

Strong painkillers and driving

You may have noticed that the label on your painkiller medicine says: “May cause drowsiness. If affected do not drive or operate machinery. Avoid alcoholic drink.”

Your doctor or nurse may also have discussed side effects of your painkillers with you.

Strong painkillers (or opioids) affect each person in a different way. They can make some people drowsy and reactions can be slower than usual. This may be worse if you take other medicines that cause drowsiness or if you drink alcohol. If you are someone who drives you may be wondering if it is safe for you to drive. The following information will help you to decide.

  • You must not drive if you feel sleepy
  • You must not drive after drinking alcohol or taking strong drugs which have not been prescribed or recommended by your doctor for example, cannabis.
  • You must not drive if you start taking other drugs that cause sleepiness, either prescribed by your doctor or bought from the chemist for example, hay fever medicine.
  • You must not drive on days where you have had to take extra (breakthrough or rescue) doses of a strong painkiller.